Confessions of an Over Packer


suitcaseHomily for the 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time
July 15, 2018

I had a conversation with one of my daughters the other day. We were talking about a character flaw we share in common: We are both “over packers.” When packing for trips, we tend to pack too much stuff – too many changes of clothing; too may supplies; and too many things to read.

This over packing usually leads to two things: First, our suitcases are stuffed to the max and they weigh a ton. Second, we rarely ever us all of the things we thought we just had to have for the trip.

I thought about this conversation while reflecting on today’s Gospel. When commissioning his disciples, Jesus gave strict orders what to “pack” and what to leave behind on their journey. The disciples were to bring only what they had on their back – no food, no luggage, no changes of clothing, and no money. They were allowed to bring a walking stick and their sandals (this indicated that they had a long, difficult journey ahead of them).

Rather than being burdened by human decisions as they went about their work as missionaries, Jesus wanted his disciples to:

  • Rely on God’s grace (God would provide all they needed to minister and heal others)
  • Rely on the kindness of strangers (to provide for their earthly needs)
  • Rely on each other (Jesus sent them out two-by-two for a reason!)

And if things didn’t go well in a particular town, and people didn’t listen to the disciples, they were instructed to move on (to “leave there and shake the dust off your feet in testimony against them”).

We can learn a lot from this relatively short Gospel passage:

  1. We learn that we have to avoid being overwhelmed and weighed down by our earthly needs and open our ears and our hearts to what God wants to do for us in our “mission” on earth.

 So think about the ways you “over pack” in your life and fail to listen to God.

For me – in addition to over packing my suitcase, I can weigh myself down with all the diversions in my life. For example, not taking enough time in silent prayer, and loading myself up with reading material during adoration, instead of just listening). It’s hard to hear God when you refuse to listen!

  1. We can get caught up trying to minister alone when, in truth, we are called to live and work in community.

It’s hard to hear God when you lock the door to your heat and close out God – and your friends and family.

In whatever we do in life, it is important to listen to God. It is important to trust in God’s grace working all around us.

  1. It is important to persevere in our life’s work, but it is also important to know when it is time to “accept the things you cannot change” and, like the disciples, “shake the dust off your sandals and walk away.

This isn’t giving up; this is moving on. This is not failure; this is commitment to doing God’s will.

Each of us has gifts to share, and each of us is called to share those gifts. W may not think we are “called” to be missionaries, but we are.

Listen to the prophet Amos in the First Reading, we may feel like simple shepherds or farmers, but don’t let that stop you from hearing and responding to God’s call to serve. As Amos understood, “God doesn’t call the equipped, He equips the called.”

So, this week, I encourage you to think about a couple of things:

  1. What is it that God is calling you to do – right now – to serve him and God’s people?
  2. What are some of the things that burden you or weigh you down that, if left behind would allow you to be the best version of yourself?

A prophet (like Amos) is one who hears and proclaims the will of God. How are you a prophet? How are you a missionary?

Remember how the disciples trusted God to provide for them in their work. It began with listening.